How Knowing Our Roots Keeps Us Grounded…

Catering/Healing Foods

How Knowing Our Roots Keeps Us Grounded…

Photo courtesy of Erich Smith

Aside of  being a part of the same family, our roots share genetic qualities that make them similar, yet distinctive, hard, yet soft, dark, yet light. I have to say I love the way mother nature reflects balance in her bounty. One of the most important attributes of most cruciferous vegetables, whether tubers, rhizomes, bulbs, or corms, are their grounding and healing effect. An ideal food for nurturing the root chakra, particularly for those who eat mainly a plant-based diet. While plant-based foods have an “enlightening” effect, it is also necessary to be rooted.  Root vegetables, tenaciously burrowed in the depth of the earth graciously transmits this strength vibration to us so that we can benefit from its very nature, for our own stability. If there is an imbalance in the root chakra, the flow of energy to the higher chakras can be disrupted and even stagnated, so adding roots to your diet is an easy and effective way to help balance your energy body, flow upward and stand firm – a mirror reflection of a root vegetable. It is energy that the physical body needs and food is the vehicle by which we can deliver to it, what it needs to perform for us in ways that we can achieve greater health, on all levels.  While some are anti-inflammatory, detoxifying, mucus busting, blood building and nourishing for organs, most, if not all roots are low in fat, high in fiber, and a great source of Calcium and Vitamin C, among other vitamins and minerals.  They include: radishes, daikon, parsnips, turnips, rutabaga, yucca (mandioca), taro, sweet potatoes, potatoes, beets, burdock, sunchoke, wasabi, jicama, lotus root, chicory, ginger, galangal, and turmeric.

Photo courtesy of Erich Smith

An ideal time for soup, this past week I prepared a ROOT SOUP, with daikon, turnips, carrots, onions, garlic, fennel, parsnips, rutabaga, yucca, sweet potatoes and added ancient millet for additional protein.

This week I used the very same root vegetables, with the addition of  beets, as a side dish, oven roasted with garlic and onions in expeller-pressed coconut oil. I couldn’t stop there, and was inspired to create a Smoked Paprika Wasabi Dip for my roots. YUM!

Photo courtesy of Erich Smith

So whether you soup it up, slaw it up, roasted it up, anyway you choose to prepare it, you’ll be rooted and ready to sprout!

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