Healing with Wasabi

Healing Foods

Healing with Wasabi

Wasabi Brussel Sprout Slaw

If you have an affinity towards spicy foods, then wasabi should be one to consider and even add to staple of spices. Wasabi is also known as Japanese Horseradish and not only has a tastefully poignant presence, it leaves us with a sweet hangover and has healing abilities unsurpassable to other rhizomes. Since wasabi belongs to the Cruciferae family, along with broccoli, brussels sprouts, cabbage, cress and mustard, I was intuitively led to add it a brussels sprout slaw. It also pairs well with garlic, sesame seeds and onions, all of which are also included in this delicious raw salad.

As a healing food, wasabi contains compounds that increase bone density, so if osteoporosis is a concern, then wasabi may be a supplement to learn more about.  As a complement to brussels sprouts, which are high in iron and calcium, you have yourself not only nourishment for the heart chakra, but a bone-blood building food as well. Wasabi’s  anti-microbial properties led to its introduction to the raw fish diet in Japan and was used before our time of refrigeration to kill bacteria and camouflage unfavorable tastes. It’s anti-platelet effect inhibits blood clot formation, making it a great cardiovascular ally, one that keeps the best interest of heart health in mind. Wasabi is also an ideal ingredient for detox, as it removes toxins, treats fungal infections, allergies, inflammation, and even helps with type 2 diabetes and counteracting cancer.

Thewasabifinal flip side to all goodness found in wasabi is that most wasabi isn’t wasabi. This “faux wasabi” is made of horseradish, mustard powder, cornstarch and food coloring. Wasabi comes in a few grades and when shopping for genuine wasabi, you will want to go for  Grade 1, which is the real deal, 100% wasabi, as  lesser grades may contain little to none of its magic healing potential.

While wasabi paste is a usual sushi accompaniment, step outside the box and add it to dips, sandwich spreads, marinades, dressings for salads, noodle dishes and whatever protein source you prefer. It’s an addition to any dish that you will have to taste to know. Fresh wasabi is not only expensive, but it’s also hard to come by. I prefer to use dried wasabi, in powder form. It’s convenient, shelf-stable and cost-effective.

 

Have you ever tried adding wasabi to any of your meals? What are some creative ways you’ve used wasabi?

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